Natural philosophy

 Sometimes nature is messy.  The nesting bluebirds that my neighbor lovingly supplied with dried mealy worms and fresh water abandoned their eggs, most likely because a week-long heat wave left them boiled. Despite the presence of a large dog in my backyard, each spring another brood of rabbit kits is deposited under the pine tree, doomed to an early end.

At other times, nature is wonderfully neat. Consider the monarch butterfly who intuitively knows to lay its eggs on milkweed leaves. Monarch caterpillars will only eat milkweed, and by ingesting its toxic leaves become themselves toxic, reducing the risk of predation. A fallen tree, food for fungi, beetles, spiders, and other decomposers, will one day nourish the forest floor in the form of rich, crumbly soil.

Not surprisingly, a search of nature quotes reveals that even great thinkers are in disagreement over nature’s role as hero or villain.  Nature advocates wax poetic about flowers and sunshine; Aristotle claimed that “in all things of nature there is something of the marvelous.”  Nature’s detractors cite death, doom, and destruction, Italian writer Ugo Betti intoning, “There is no forgiveness in nature.”

I myself am more in line with Vincent Van Gogh, who wrote, “When I have a terrible need of—shall I say the word—religion….  Then I go out and paint the stars.” Perhaps we will find no answers there—at least not ones within our realm of understanding—but oh, what a view.

"The Starry Night" - Vincent Van Gogh

“The Starry Night” – Vincent Van Gogh

by Jenny Houghton
Youth Program Coordinator

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One thought on “Natural philosophy

  1. Nature can be messy I agree but the best thing is what happened to a very messy dying cinnamon fern that was left forgotten in a pot by the stone wall, its leaves were limp and dying but surrounding it was green sphagnum moss. will it die? Oh well’ lets see if it will come back? It was watered and tucked into rich moist soil. Now there are three tiny fronds peeking out from the edge of the plant!. Isn’t that amazing? Was the moss a good friend an kept the root alive?

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